COVID 19 RESPONSE

We are experiencing a pivotal moment in history. With majority of countries in the world implementing lock downs, curfews and stay at home orders for the first time in this century, (or first time EVER?!) we have seen a wide variety of reactions to this seemingly interminable state of confinement.

While some of us have adapted to our current reality, some of us are struggling to cope with a variety of new, old or amplified challenges. Social media feeds seem split between advocating for extreme productivity made possible by quarantine versus ways to practice radical self-care and cope with anxiety, frustration and fears.

There is no “correct” way to cope with this new reality. As we near another month of quarantine, we are all just trying to find ways to stay positive and make it through a difficult and uncertain time. While these theories face off in the digital world, I always find myself drawn back to images of empathy, altruism and kindness. On days when stress, frustration and sadness are running high, I find solace in the stories of young people working to support their peers, families and communities through the various levels of lockdown that we are experiencing around the world.

From finding ways to maintain supporting vulnerable communities and raising awareness, young people across the globe are doing all that they can to help us deal with this virus and its effects.

We will get through this crisis. And when we do, I am sure that history will show the world’s young people helped to build a bridge from fear to hope and from confusion to understanding.

These young people help me feel like, even though it doesn’t always feel like it, everything will be alright. And, right now, that means the world.

Some clicks from our recent event

Velveeta Viban and Kabila Gana Lapnet (Cameroon)

Supporting IDPs with sanitation and educational needs

As in many countries around the world, vulnerable populations in Cameroon have greater risks being impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. With school closures and increased difficulty accessing public services now added to pre-existing challenges, there are worries that the effects of the pandemic will disproportionately affect them, leading to the widening inequalities such as the literacy gap, especially amongst the Internally displaced persons (IDPs).

To address this, Velveeta Viban, the founder of I am Human Org initiated a Crisis Response Education Project to help over 700+ internally displaced persons who have fled civil unrest in different parts of the country and are living in cluster communities with little access to basic needs. Her Project provides them with adaptable water dispensing buckets, disinfectants, soaps and hand sanitizers to improve their sanitation conditions especially in a time like this when washing hands is primordial. To expand the impact of her project, Velveeta partnered with Youths4Change, led by Kabila Gana Lapnet. Thanks to this partnership, they are also providing children across Cameroon with educational materials like activity books, animated videos, charts and games so that they can maintain their education.